Slog 05 – Why I Don't Go To Protests

If you can’t see the video above, click here.

Here’s the full text script of the above video from one of my earlier posts, Why I Don’t Go To Protests:

Hey guys, it’s the Andy-San here to discuss why I don’t go to protests.One of my managers asked me to join him in a protest at Washington D.C. and I turned down his offer. Initially, the reason for this was because I didn’t want to go all the way out to D.C. and possibly be stranded since I wouldn’t be driving my own truck and also because I don’t know him very well personally. As I began to really think about it though, I found out the two real reasons I didn’t want to protest:

1 – Openly protesting exposes your identity. If a protest were to turn sour, I don’t want the FBI or whoever else to show up at my house and brainwash me. I don’t want them to know who I am as an individual. It’s not that I have anything to hide, it’s just that I want my privacy to be maintained. Obviously, I know that by posting this, I’m exposing myself a bit and they can trace me. However, I’ve protected my personal information decently so unless they really, really want to go after me, they won’t find me.

2 – Protests present problems but no solutions. Anybody can complain, but it takes someone who’s motivated and educated on the situation to present a solution to the problem. If a protest were to present a detailed, functional, and practical solution to resolve what they’re protesting about, then I would support them. I still wouldn’t expose myself, but I would do other things like put up a link to their site on my blog and recommend my viewers to visit their site and support them however they want.

Now, I’d like to define a proper solution as best and as simple as I can. Is your solution:

1 – Detailed? Picture this: you’re working a job that you really hate (some, like me, wouldn’t have to think too hard about it!). You tell the boss, “This job sucks! I hate working here!” If you didn’t get fired for saying that, then your boss might ask, “Why do you hate working here and what can I do to help?” Most people either don’t know how to answer the question or just complain about something trivial. It’s okay to vent (just try not to make a scene, ok?) because it releases your frustration and allows you to better focus on a solution. However, simply venting won’t fix the solution. If you want to change the problem, make sure you point out details. Is it a certain work policy that you don’t agree with? Is a certain coworker giving you trouble? Or is it a personal issue? Writing down the details helps you to keep track of things and lets you filter out less relevent matters and expand upon the more pressing issues.

2 – Functional? It’s as simple as asking, “Does it work?”. Can your solution work in practice or is it just theory? Have there been successful attempts at implementing similiar solutions? Be sure to cite these solutions to make your case more credible.

3 – Practical? Is your solution feesible? Can your plan be utilized with a reasonable amount of money and manpower?

4 – Good for the company? I’m sorry, I had to pull out a classic Office Space quote. It’s still a valid question though. Is your solution aiding everybody or just a select few? Will this adversly affect others within the company?

Final summation (totally not ripped off from TheGradualReport lol), the reason that most protests don’t work is because they’re essentially bitch-fits on a larger scale. Don’t get me wrong, sometimes protesting works; take Martin Luthur King Jr for example. For the most part, however, it’s just venting without a proper solution.

Well, that’s it for me for now. Enjoy yourselves!

Andy-San out!

This is the last slog, err, podcast that I’ve recorded so far. Since I have a camera, I don’t really see the need to put up audio files on YouTube unless it’s a song I wrote or something along those lines.

Here’s the original description for the video:

What’s goin on, it’s the Andy-San here with a more serious vlog about why I don’t go to protests. Enjoy and please leave a comment if you’d like!

TheAndySan

I'm In One Dilly Of A Pickle Here, Guys!!

Greetings! It’s the Andy-San here with some questions.

Today at work, I found a $20 bill on the ground. It wasn’t in any of the self-checkouts and there were no customers around it. I picked it up and debated on whether I should put it in the coupon slot like I do for all the other money I find in the self-checkouts. Usually, I just find quarters or a $1 bill, but this is the first time in my life that I found a $20 lying on the ground. I held onto it and took it home with me. I feel so bad for doing that, but I came to this conclusion:

On one hand, when there’s change left behind, I’m supposed to put it either by my drawer or in a spot where customers won’t find it. On the other hand, the $20 bill in question wasn’t in the self-checkout machine, I didn’t see the customer drop the bill, and there was no one near it when I found it.

On one hand, I would be benefiting the most from the $20 bill because I only have one source of income compared to Wal-Mart’s numerous sources. I would probably spend it at Wal-Mart anyway so they’re not losing money. On the other hand, it’s still money that’s left behind.

I came to the conclusion that I should keep the $20 bill unless Wal-Mart asks for it since they most likely caught me on camera picking it up off the ground. I would be supporting the U.S. economy by buying something and I would be supporting businesses as well. Did I make the right decision? Please leave me a comment to tell me what you think about it.

Also, when I got off work today, I saw in the Electronics section a new Dell XPS 420. It has the same quad-core processor as the one computer that I want and it comes with a keyboard, mouse, 19 in. flatscreen monitor, Windows Vista Home Premium, and possibly speakers. All of this is for around $1,000. I could use my discount to take it down to $900, so for essentially $100 more than the other computer, I can get a monitor, mouse, keyboard, an OS, and possibly speakers. The only drawbacks is that it has 1 GB less RAM and I think the hard drive might be smaller. Other than that, it seems like a friggin’ sw33t deal!! What do you guys think?

In other news, my stepdad and I kicked out the jams today with Beat It. We heard it on the radio (the Fall-Out-Boy cover, which is pretty bitchin’, but not as good as the original) and decided to give it a whirl. I knew the main riff but I didn’t know the verse riffs and the bridge, so I look up the tab for it and away we went. Our timing was pretty crappy, but hey, it’s our first crack at the song so it’s all good. Also, I never realized how mixed-down the guitar parts are in Beat It. I could hear Michael and the drums, but the guitar was pretty quiet so it was kinda hard to keep time.

Well, I’m gonna get goin’. Good-night!

Andy-San

Why I Don't Go To Protests

Hello first day of spring, it’s the Andy-San here with a fresh-off-the-grill slog. Mmm, slog! As always, you can watch the video or read the slog script below:

Hey guys, it’s the Andy-San here to discuss why I don’t go to protests.
One of my managers asked me to join him in a protest at Washington D.C. and I turned down his offer. Initially, the reason for this was because I didn’t want to go all the way out to D.C. and possibly be stranded since I wouldn’t be driving my own truck and also because I don’t know him very well personally. As I began to really think about it though, I found out the two real reasons I didn’t want to protest:

1 – Openly protesting exposes your identity. If a protest were to turn sour, I don’t want the FBI or whoever else to show up at my house and brainwash me. I don’t want them to know who I am as an individual. It’s not that I have anything to hide, it’s just that I want my privacy to be maintained. Obviously, I know that by posting this, I’m exposing myself a bit and they can trace me. However, I’ve protected my personal information decently so unless they really, really want to go after me, they won’t find me.

2 – Protests present problems but no solutions. Anybody can complain, but it takes someone who’s motivated and educated on the situation to present a solution to the problem. If a protest were to present a detailed, functional, and practical solution to resolve what they’re protesting about, then I would support them. I still wouldn’t expose myself, but I would do other things like put up a link to their site on my blog and recommend my viewers to visit their site and support them however they want.

Now, I’d like to define a proper solution as best and as simple as I can. Is your solution:

1 – Detailed? Picture this: you’re working a job that you really hate (some, like me, wouldn’t have to think too hard about it!). You tell the boss, “This job sucks! I hate working here!” If you didn’t get fired for saying that, then your boss might ask, “Why do you hate working here and what can I do to help?” Most people either don’t know how to answer the question or just complain about something trivial. It’s okay to vent (just try not to make a scene, ok?) because it releases your frustration and allows you to better focus on a solution. However, simply venting won’t fix the solution. If you want to change the problem, make sure you point out details. Is it a certain work policy that you don’t agree with? Is a certain coworker giving you trouble? Or is it a personal issue? Writing down the details helps you to keep track of things and lets you filter out less relevent matters and expand upon the more pressing issues.

2 – Functional? It’s as simple as asking, “Does it work?”. Can your solution work in practice or is it just theory? Have there been successful attempts at implementing similiar solutions? Be sure to cite these solutions to make your case more credible.

3 – Practical? Is your solution feesible? Can your plan be utilized with a reasonable amount of money and manpower?

4 – Good for the company? I’m sorry, I had to pull out a classic Office Space quote. It’s still a valid question though. Is your solution aiding everybody or just a select few? Will this adversly affect others within the company?

Final summation (totally not ripped off from TheGradualReport lol), the reason that most protests don’t work is because they’re essentially bitch-fits on a larger scale. Don’t get me wrong, sometimes protesting works; take Martin Luthur King Jr for example. For the most part, however, it’s just venting without a proper solution.

Well, that’s it for me for now. Enjoy yourselves!

Andy-San out!

I noticed today that I got 69 views yesterday. Holy ass-crackers, Batman! I’m also planning on redoing my Love Hina review as well as doing a review of another anime (most likely Bleach). I’ve found that you have to reveal some plot in order to do a proper review. Besides, the review I did was far too short even for my tastes. Stay tuned as it’ll be coming soon!

Well, that’s it for me today. Enjoy yourselves and leave a comment if you’d like. See-ya!

Andy-San